3.02.2016

XF-41 experimental naval fighter

Designed in late 1944, the XF-41 was a combat fighter of revolutionary and highly radical design, that was forgotten by the advent of the jet age and was kept in such secrecy that the knowledge of the project never left NXB-1, a naval testing base located somewhere in the pacific.


Almost by accident, its designers stumbled upon the most maneuverable aerodynamic design in history. Mathematically, the XF-41's airframe was in a "zone of perfection" that made the plane able to pull off any maneuver with ease. It was impossible to stall the plane and it could make a 180 degree turn in about a second.  The plane could not carry ordinance, the slightest adjustment of the plane's airframe would negate the 'zone of perfection" and the entire aircraft would become completely unstable. Therefore, the aircraft was also very sensitive to combat damage.

A squadron of five XF-41s operated from an unnamed carrier in the pacific where they were deployed in utmost secrecy, no Japanese aircraft spotted could be allowed to get away, and any crew of an allied aircraft would be taken in for questioning if it they spotted a XF-41. They could be held in custody till the end of the war in some cases. 

Despite it's incredible qualities, it came too late. The Navy decided to keep the project secret, even though it was obsolete for most military purposes. One of the designers said it was akin to, "inventing a supersonic car, then having somebody invent a time machine the next morning".

(note: this aircraft and its story is fictional)-Andrew

11 comments:

  1. Wow! beautiful design. And Awesome story. I think it would be cool write a fiction piece around this.

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    1. Thanks, I plan on using this style with my art work posts from now on.

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    2. And if you ever wanted to write a story about it, you can, as I usually don't get far whenever I try to write one! I just came up with a new idea recently, but so far nothing has really caught on.

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  2. "Somewhere in the pacific." You totally stole that from McHale's Navy. hahaha
    The drawing is really nice. :)

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    1. Everybody uses that, do some research before making false accusations.

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    2. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  3. Very cool plane. And the cover story sounded so plausible that I might have believed it if you hadn't added the disclaimer. The "unnamed aircraft carrier" should have clued me in.

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    1. thanks, yeah, I really like the style of it, instead of my previous ones where I'm just saying "suppose it would do this" and "I suppose it would be this fast bla bla" I'm going to do a small follow-up post to, since I didn't mention its specs and a few other things.

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    2. Cool. And I am going to post a short story on it on my blog sometime. If that is alright with you.

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    3. Sure, it will be cool reading it!

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